Juliet’s House in Verona, Italy

Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
The balcony on the side of Juliet’s House in Verona, Italy.

As testified by the coat of arms on the internal arch-way of the court-yard, this house belonged to the “Dal Cappello” or “Cappelletti”. The building, dating back to the 13th and renovated in the last century, features the balcony where Romeo promised his beloved Juliet eternal love in Shakespeare’s famous tragedy.

Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
The sculpture of Juliet attracts a lot of attention.

Young couples are still very moved by the right of this house and unmarried people touch Juliet’s statue (a kind of good-luck ritual) in the hope of finding the love of their life.

Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
Heading through a small tunnel toward’s Juliet’s house.

How many hopes and desires has this court-yard witnessed over the ages?

Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
Thousands of people have left their mark on this wall.

The interior of the house can be visited and you can stand on Juliet’s balcony and re-live the “ high-light” of the earthly life, as well as admire the furniture and the beautiful velvet costumes worn by the actors in the Metro Goldwyn Meyer’s colossal “ Romeo and Juliet”. Source: Verona Tourism.

Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
QUESTE FURONO LE CASE DEI CAPULETI D’ONDE USCI LA GIULIETTA PER CUI TANTO PIANSERO I CUORI GENTILI E I POETI CANTARONO.

Adige River in Verona, Italy

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Adige  is the second longest river in Italy after the Po, rising in the Alps in the province of South Tyrol near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland, flowing 410 kilometres (250 mi) through most of North-East Italy to the Adriatic Sea.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The river sources near the Reschen Pass (1,504 metres (4,934 ft)) close to the borders with Austria and Switzerland above the Inn valley. It flows through the artificial alpine Lake Reschen. The lake is known for the church tower that marks the site of the former village of Alt Graun (“Old Graun”); it was evacuated and flooded in 1953 after the dam was finished. Near Glurns, the Rom river joins from the Swiss Val Müstair.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Adige runs eastbound through the Vinschgau to Merano, where it is met by the Passer river from the north. The section between Merano and Bolzano, is called Etschtal, meaning Adige Valley. South of Bolzano, the river is joined by the Eisack and turns south through a valley which has always been one of the major routes through the Alps, connecting the Reschen and the Brenner passes, at 1,370 metres (4,490 ft) considered the easiest of the main Alpine passes.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Chiusa di Salorno narrows at Salorno mark the southernmost part of the predominantly German-speaking province of South Tyrol. The Adige was mentioned in the “Lied der Deutschen” of 1841 as the southern border of the German language area (which it still is). In 1922 Germany adopted the song as its national anthem, although by that time Italy had taken control of all of the Adige.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

Near Trento, the Avisio, Noce, and Fersina rivers join. The Adige crosses Trentino and later Veneto, flowing past the town of Rovereto, the Lagarina Valley, the cities of Verona and Adria and the north-eastern part of the Po Plain into the Adriatic Sea. The Adige and the Po run parallel in the river delta without properly joining.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Adige is connected to Lake Garda by the Mori-Torbole tunnel, an artificial underground canal built for flood prevention.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Adige is a home to the marble trout (Salmo marmoratus), but at far lower populations than in the past. Fish stocking is one of the most significant causes of the sharp reduction in the original (indigenous) fish population of this subspecies. It will spawn with and interbreed with brown trout, which are regularly stocked in the river and its tributaries. Source: Wikipedia.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

Green, Gray and White in The Berner Oberland

Berner Oberland
Berner Oberland

The Berner Oberland, is the higher part of the canton of Bern, Switzerland, in the southern end of the canton, and one of the canton’s five administrative regions (in which context it is referred to as Oberland without further specification).

The whole region consists of the area around Meiringen and Hasliberg up to Grimsel Pass (2,164 m [7,100 ft]), around Lake Thun (558 m [1,831 ft]) and Lake Brienz, and the valleys of many high mountains with the inevitable Jungfrau Peak (4,158 m [13,642 ft]), the area southwest of the Lake Thun with Kandersteg (connection to the Valais) and Adelboden, and the area round Gstaad and Lenk in the Simmental. The mountain range in the Berner Oberland south of the Aare and north of the Rhône are collectively called the Bernese Alps. Source: Wikipedia.

Walking Through Balzers, Liechtenstein

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Clouds playing with the mountaintops in Balzers, Liechtenstein

The proof of continuous settlement in Balzers can be found from the early Stone Age (about 3000 B.C.), to the modern day.

Historically, the present-day form of the village consists of two different villages, the actual Balzers in the east and Mäls in the west. Not visible to the unaware, the division still persists in the local village culture, where it manifests in half-serious local competition. Some customs, such as the “Funken” a springtime ritual with pre-Christian origins involving a huge bonfire, are still being practised by each separately. The two parts were first mentioned in 842 as Palazole.

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Pleasant suburban neighborhood in Balzers, Liechtenstein.

In the northern part of the village archaeologists found the foundations of Roman buildings in 1933 and 1967. The finds included sixty Roman coins (from 46-42 B.C.) that point to the Roman rule of Balzers, highlighting the history of the twin villages of Balzers and Mäls, where the Rätische Mäls is the older of the ‘twins’. While “Meilis”, as Mäls is called in the Rätic language, cannot so far be interpreted etymologically, the name Balzers (Palazoles) can be linked with the Latin “palatium” (Lordship, Pfalz).

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Crosswalk in Balzers, Liechtenstein.

Since subjecting the Rätians (15 B.C.) to the “Imperium Romanum” the location as a “village on the Knights road” has shaped the Balzner history, since the road led across the alpine Julier and Spluegen passes along the mountain-slope through the village. Balzers experienced rapid development in the twentieth century – a testament to the continued importance of its location.

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Blooming bush in Balzers, Liechtenstein.

The archaeological finds of 1934 at the south foot of the Gutenberg castle hill provided the most southerly discovery of the “Rössener culture.” Early and the late Bronze Age remains have also been found around Gutenberg.

Balzers is the home of the Burg Gutenberg, a 12th-century castle which is located on a rocky hill in the center of the town.

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Thanks for visiting Balzers, Liechtenstein with me!

Whilst it only has 4,368 inhabitants, the village has seen a rapid industrialisation. Balzers is the southernmost village in Liechtenstein and is approximately 472 m above sea level with an area of 19.6 square km. With its important and interesting historical past, the village has felt obliged to continue to care for its environment. The village council therefore promises that each inhabitant is ensured a healthy life in a beautiful environment. Source: Wikipedia and About Liechtenstein.

View From Mürren

 

Mürren is a traditional Walser mountain village in Bernese Highlands, Switzerland, at an elevation of 1,638 metres (5,374 ft) above sea level and unreachable by public road. Tourism is popular through the summer and winter; the village features a view of the three towering mountains: Eiger, Mönch, and Jungfrau. Mürren has a population of just 450, but has 2,000 hotel beds.

Mürren has its own school and two churches, one Reformed and one Roman Catholic. Source: Wikipedia.